Brentwood United Methodist Church

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Welcome to Brentwood UMC

We are glad you are here! We would love to have you join us in worship in one of our various services. We offer worship services on Saturday and Sunday. These services range from traditional to blended.

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Service Times

Saturday Evening
6:00 pm Casual/traditional

Sunday Mornings

8:15 am Traditional/blended
9:45 am Contemporary
11:05 am Traditional

Directions

We are located at 309 Franklin Road, Brentwood, TN.  We are directly across from the Brentwood Place Shopping Center, 1.5 miles south of Old Hickory Blvd.

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For Adults

We have many opportunities each week to help connect you with others. Whether that’s in a Sunday morning class, a small group, a short-term class, or a Disciple Bible Study group. 

Sunday Morning Classes Short-term Classes

For Your Children

We have many opportunities each week to connect your preschoolers and elementary aged children with others and to grow their faith.

MORE INFO HERE Weekday preschools

For Your Teens

We have many ministry opportunities going on each week to help you connect with others, grow in your faith and use your gifts. If you are a new youth to BUMC in the 7th-12th grade, we hope you will join us on a Sunday night for worship, small groups, and youth choir.

Weekly ScheduleYouth Choirs

BUMC Organ/Piano

Concert Grand Bosendorfer Piano

BUMC is fortunate to use as its Sanctuary piano a concert grand Bosendorfer, donated in 2008 by Cal Turner in honor of BUMC Senior pastor Dr.Howard Olds. The Bosendorfer piano has the distinction of being one of the largest keyboard instruments designed by any piano manufacturer. It includes an extra octave of keys at the lower end of the bass which add to the piano's resonance and beautiful sound. Each octave of the Bosendorfer is purposefully designed to sound different colors and timbres, so may truly be heard as an "orchestral" instrument. It adds a vital voice and speaks worship in many different ways throughout the week. During the dedication service, the metal frame was signed by Dr. and Mrs. Olds which you might see when the lid is open. The Sanctuary Bosendorfer is one of the finest musical instruments made - please take a moment to enjoy playing when you have an opportunity.

A History of the Pipe Organs at Brentwood United Methodist Church

By Charles Witherspoon, Organist Emeritus

THE CHAPEL ORGAN

Reuter, Op. 1797

When Brentwood Methodist Episcopal Church built a Sanctuary on Church Street in 1886, members bought a foot-pumped Packard reed organ.  This instrument served the church until 1916.
In 1916 an eight-rank Felgemaker pipe organ was installed.  This was made possible by a gift from Pittsburg philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.  Carnegie paid approximately half the cost of the organ while the congregation paid the remainder.  Carnegie’s plan resulted in the installation of pipe organs in many small churches throughout the country.
The church was encouraged in this endeavor by Fount Rion.  Mr. Rion was a sales representative for the Felgemaker Organ Company of Erie, Pennsylvania.  He also worked for the L & N Railroad and was active for many years at Brentwood where he served as Sunday School Superintendent and church organist.  He was also responsible for the installation of stained glass windows in the original Sanctuary. The new organ had electro-pneumatic action with eight speaking stops:

GREAT
        8 Open Diapason
        8 Melodia
        8 Dulciana
SWELL
        8 Aeoline
        8 Voix Celeste
        8 Stopped Diapason
        4 Harmonic Flute
        Tremolo
SWELL
        8 Aeoline
        8 Voix Celeste
        8 Stopped Diapason
        4 Harmonic Flute
        Tremolo
PEDAL
        16 Bourdon
    Great to Pedal 8
    Swell to Pedal 8
    Swell to Great 16, 8, 4
    Swell and Crescendo Pedals
    Four combination pistons

In 1936 the church building and most of its contents was destroyed by fire, a result of a lightning strike.  Two years later, in July 1938, a new building was completed.  The organist at that time, Robert I. Moore, gave money for a seven-rank Pilcher organ designed by his friend, Fount Rion.  It was to be similar to the Felgemaker.
The Pilcher, with a full complement of couplers, had more variety of sound than the Felgemaker.  It was used until the church moved to its present location in 1972.  Four of the Pilcher ranks plus chime tubes were incorporated in the new Reuter organ, still in use:

   GREAT
        8 Open Diapason
        8 Melodia
        8 Muted Viol
        4 Flute (ext. Melodia)
  PEDAL
        16 Bourdon (Melodia)
        16 Lieblich Gedeckt (13 pipes)
    SWELL
        8 Melodia
        8 Salicional
        8 Voix Celeste
        8 Muted Viol
        4 Flute Harmonique
        8 Oboe (reedless)
        Tremolo

  Great to Pedal 8, 4
  Swell to Pedal 8
  Swell to Great 16, 8, 4
  Great to Great 16, 4
  Swell to Swell 16, 4
  Swell Unison Off

  Swell and Crescendo Pedals
  Eight combination pistons
  Great to Pedal, reversible

The Reuter organ (now in the current Chapel) was initially designed jointly by W.K. Dowling and Charles Witherspoon.  Mr. Dowling was an organ tuner and technician who served as the church’s consultant.  The specifications were sent to Möller, Reuter, and Hillgreen-Lane.  Each company sent a representative to our former building on Church Street.  They examined the pipes in our seven-rank Pilcher and agreed to use four of the ranks as we had suggested.
The contract was awarded to Reuter and a two-manual, thirty-two rank instrument was built for approximately $56,000.  The Henry Cannon family agreed to give this amount to the church for the purchase of the organ.  Mrs. Cannon was “Minnie Pearl” of the Grand Ole Opry.
The instrument, which contained four Pilcher ranks plus twenty-one chime tubes, was installed in December 1972 by Randall Dyer of the Reuter Company.  Mr. Dyer now has a successful organ building firm in East Tennessee.  The organ was voiced by Franklin Mitchell who later became president of the Reuter Organ Company.  A consecration recital was played in 1973 by Myron S. Braun.  The following year, a full-scale recital was given by Clark Angel of Norwalk, Ohio.  Mr. Angel had formerly been a recordings reviewer for a leading organ magazine.


THE SANCTUARY ORGAN

Möller, Op. 11829

The Sanctuary Möller organ, installed in December 1991, was designed by a committee that included Mark Acker (music director), Dan Elkins (former music director), Mary Phillips (organist), Charles Witherspoon (organist emeritus), and Jozelle Crabtree (church member).  The committee examined several organs, including those built by Schantz, Möller, Reuter, and Casavant.  William S. Gray, at the time the Möller representative for this area, offered advice and suggested that members of the committee visit a large Möller installation north of Atlanta.   It was decided to model our organ on this instrument.  The contract was given to Möller. The organ was one of the last built by the Möller Company.  It was voiced by Daniel Angerstein.  The new instrument had four manuals and seventy-one ranks of pipes.  A number of additional ranks were prepared for on the console.  The organ was paid for out of church funds, although several items, such as the console, chimes, and Zimbelstern were bought by individuals.  The total cost of the organ without additions was approximately $500,000.  And opening recital was given by Frederick Swann.  Other recitalists have included Albin Whitworth and Christopher Pardini.
A few years later, a gift from Cal Turner made possible the purchase of over twenty digital stops manufactured by the Walker Company.  This completed the prepared specification and added a few voices not included in the original stop list.